https://149362186.v2.pressablecdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/IMG_5643-1280x720.jpg

This is a response to Bella Spangher’s column, “Leave the debate about abortion to the experts.” in our Aug. 30 issue. Photo by Oliver Chapin-Eiserloh Are campus conversations between students on politics enriching or too distracting? Bella Spangher, guest columnist for the Trinitonian in last week’s issue, believes that they are “superfluous and stressful distractions” and that she “does not want to be badgered into stressful and sensitive conversations surrounding abortion” while she walks across...

https://149362186.v2.pressablecdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/08/Noise-1280x720.jpg

Illustration by Andrea Nebhut Imagine if Student A asked Student B the question “What do you think about the United States’ increasing abortion restrictions?” while waiting for their Spanish professor to arrive to class. Student B might respond (instead of reviewing the reading from the previous night) and proceed to argue with Student A. When the professor arrives to class, both Student A and B are frazzled, as well as anyone who overheard their conversation,...

https://149362186.v2.pressablecdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Uterus.jpg

Trinity Progressives (T-Prog) hosted “Reproductive Justice 101” on Feb. 20, as the club addresses reproductive health, access and justice. About 20 people attended the discussion, which was co-sponsored by the women and gender studies (WAGS) department. The event primarily focused on the Lilith Fund, a volunteer organization founded in 2001 that funds abortions, advocates for social change and provides information to those in need. Maddie Kennedy, junior co-president of T-Prog, introduced the Lilith Fund. Three representatives...

https://149362186.v2.pressablecdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/txsexed.png

Abstinence. That’s the advice given in the two-week sex ed program offered at my private Catholic middle school, St. Peter Prince of the Apostles. The program was called Worth the Wait, and it was only offered to fifth graders. Students had to get their parents to sign a waiver saying it was OK to participate in that segment of our health class. Those whose parents didn’t want their children to learn about sex sat in...